How do students answer graphing questions on Front Row?

One of Front Row's exciting features is that students are able to answer certain questions by creating their own graphs in the program! This not only gives students more rigorous and authentic practice with graphing, it also provides extra opportunities for them to practice the types of questions they will see on state tests.

When working with graphing questions, students should keep two things in mind:

  • Move the colored points on the graph based on the instructions in the question.
  • To move points around the graph you must click, hold, then drag the point to the location you want it to go.
  • On most questions, the current coordinates of the last point you clicked on will be visible at the center bottom of the screen.

There are five different types of graphing questions, and a few tips you can share with your students for each type so they are successful in their graphing endeavors!


Scatter Plots

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Points on a scatterplot graph will show up on the origin until all necessary points have been dragged and dropped to a location.

A scatter plot graphing question will provide your students with some amount of coordinates to graph. Note that if a question requires a student to plot multiple points, all of the points will at first show up on the origin of the graph. Students must drag each point one at a time to reveal the next one, until all points have been moved.

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Linear Equations

A linear equation requires two correct points to be plotted on the graph. Students should identify two points on the graph of the line using the strategies required by the problem. Then, they should click and drag each point one at a time to where it belongs on the coordinate system. 

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Drag and drop each colored circle one at a time to identify two correct points on the graph of a line.

 

Linear Inequalities

There are a few steps to correctly graphing a linear inequality:

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  1. Graph the boundary line that defines the inequality as you would a linear equation.
  2. Click on the line itself to change it from a dotted line (for non-inclusive inequalities) to a solid line (for inclusive inequalities) and back.
  3. Click on the side of the boundary line that indicates the part of the plane to be shaded in to switch the shading.

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Clicking on the boundary line and on separate sides of the boundary line in a linear inequality graph will make the graph switch from dotted to solid and change the shading of the plane.

 

Exponential Equations

An exponential graph requires students to identify and plot two points on the graph of the question:

  1. The y-intercept of the graph
  2. Any other point on the graph of the exponential equation

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Quadratic Equations

A quadratic graph requires students to identify and plot two points on the graph of the question:

  1. The vertex of the graph
  2. Any other point on the graph of the exponential equation

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Remember: click, hold, then drag to move points; look for coordinates of the last point you clicked on at the bottom of the graph (most questions have them)

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